Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Truck repair advice

  1. #1
    Insider PBSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,878

    Truck repair advice

    Hello,

    A few months ago I was practically given an old fleet truck from work. It's a 2003 Tacoma (2.4L base model) with 135k miles on it, and had been badly neglected. I figured the cost of parts to get it back to running would still put me considerably better than KBB even if there's a decent problem, and so far I'm well on-track. To start, I'll make a list of everything I've done to it and everything I still plan to do to it. I'm doing whatever work I can myself, so far all I've paid someone else to do is the alignment and oil change.

    Done (since 130k miles)
    Oil change
    Plugs
    Front shocks
    Belts
    Alignment
    Air Filter
    MAF
    O2 sensors
    Probably a couple other little bits I'm forgetting

    On the to-do list:
    Front brake rotors
    Power transmission flush (Ryan's going to help with this one)
    Water pump

    Everything's going pretty well, but here's the catch: I'm not sure when the last time this thing's oil was changed before I got it. It could have been up to 40k miles before I got my hands on it - it was badly neglected. The old plugs were copper and the gap was twice what it was spec'd for. The air filter was seriously starving the engine for air, and the O2 sensors were throwing those dreaded exhaust codes. Speaking of which, I have a bluetooth OBD2 scanner (if you work on cars it's stupid not to get one, they're like $15 on ebay and the smartphone apps are like $5). As of now I haven't gotten any codes in about 4k miles, I don't have any misfires or detonation issues as far as the OBD2 can tell.

    So here's the problem I'm at now: I've got a sewing machine-type noise coming from the engine. It seems throttle-dependent, my guess is the valves aren't responding as fast as they should be. It's not present at idle, although my idle is a bit rough. It seems to correspond to timing advances when my TPS gets above ~20%. I really hope my timing chain isn't worn out. I'm looking to try an oil detergent in the crankcase before I reconsider cracking the engine open for a thorough cleaning/partial rebuild, since this is my only mode of transportation it would to be difficult to work that into the schedule.

    I'm leaning towards seafoaming the crankcase for 100-200 miles (I'm about to change the oil again, I figure I should do it early this time). Is seafoam the best option? I've been reading around and it sounds like people have had good luck with Neutra 131. Should I seafoam before the next oil change, or should I change it, seafoam, and change again just to be safe?

    Any suggestions?
    Last edited by PBSteve; 04-30-2016 at 11:15 AM.
    "He died on that hill even though no one was attacking"
    I work for the company building the Paragon...once we figure out a name

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,578
    Does it have a timing belt or chain?

  3. #3
    Insider PBSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,878
    Chain, I'm hoping the long oil change interval didn't stretch it too badly. The OBD2 readings on the timing advance seemed normal.
    "He died on that hill even though no one was attacking"
    I work for the company building the Paragon...once we figure out a name

  4. #4
    Timing chain. At 130k miles, i believe on 2.4L motors the chain is going on twice its expected life. If this is your only mode of transportation, then schedule the time, hefore you have a possible catastrophic failure. I don't know if the motor is an interference motor or not. If it is, then when the timing chain goes, it will mean a total top end rebuild.

    Remember. This was abused and you are trying to keep up with the maintenance that should have heen done before you got it. Look in the truck manual at when the routine things need to be changed and DO THEM. A timing chain is a day, a nice Saturday, if you start early enough. Even asking a mechanic all that you might need as well as how long it will take. It should be fairly easy and fairly simple. You nust need to remember where everything was before you pulled it off. Take pictures for reference.

    Also, you need to commit yourself to everything. Don't cheap out with a possible fix. If you are unsure, talk to a real mechanic for a second opinion. Some might even say, "the shop will be $500+ for a timing chain. If you bring it to my house, i will do that for $200, but you get the parts.", boom, you already saved half the money. As soon as you skimp out on it, it could let you down.
    Last edited by Nobody; 04-30-2016 at 10:10 PM.

  5. #5
    Insider PBSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,878
    70k for a chain? The manufacturer spec for timing belts is usually 60-100k, and the chain does not have a recommended replacement schedule since it's supposed to be a vehicle life item.

    Unfortunately, in this vehicle it's a real pain to get to (probably since it's not a belt). If I want to do it right it'll mean pulling the engine out, not a one-day operation.

    If I get a chance tomorrow I'll pull the plugs and see if I can measure any play in it...
    Last edited by PBSteve; 04-30-2016 at 10:30 PM.
    "He died on that hill even though no one was attacking"
    I work for the company building the Paragon...once we figure out a name

  6. #6
    Its a guesstimate, every engine has different specs for routine and shop maintenance.

    With that said, you don't have to pull the engine, but if you remove the radiator, it would give you more room to do it. Like you said, its had a hard life. You can hear it, by having it running, putting a screwdriver or a stethoscope to it to see if the noise is eminating from there. Again, if you are unsure, talk to a mechanic to confirm this diag. Its hard to do via written word over the internet.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,578
    It's hard to diagnose from afar, but from your description of the sound it seems like you're hearing lifter tick.

    The other thing I'd suggest is to inspect your exhaust manifold carefully for any small holes. If the hole is in one of the cylinder leads before they join then it can give a tick sound.

  8. #8
    Insider PBSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,878
    Yeah after further investigation apparently tacoma enthusiasts refer to it as "taco tick" and to some degree it's normal.

    That's the other one people have been suggesting to others with this noise, is the exhaust manifold gasket.

    I think the play might be to take the valve cover off, replace the intake manifold, exhaust manifold and valve cover gaskets, get my hands on the chain, see what the sludge situation is and clean as much of it as possible. If it's bad that might warrant a timing system rebuild, just do the chain valves and if its worn maybe even cam all at once. I actually kind of enjoy doing the work, it's just a matter of finding time.
    Last edited by PBSteve; 05-01-2016 at 11:52 AM.
    "He died on that hill even though no one was attacking"
    I work for the company building the Paragon...once we figure out a name

  9. #9
    Hebrews 13:8 going_home's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    563
    Been driving a retired fleet vehicle 05 F150 I bought from my company for two years now.

    338k and still going.

    Just bought an 07 with 221k on it.

    Coming in from Pataskala tomorrow.

    Yeah I bought a pig in a poke but I've had good success doing it.

    The other guys on the sales force are all buying new trucks , but I'd rather drive a "beater" and have no debt.


    Translation : http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/d...-pig-in-a-poke

    Last edited by going_home; 05-01-2016 at 07:25 PM.
    endeavor to persevere.......

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    1,578
    It sounds dumb, but a funnel with a hose on it can be a decent stethoscope to help you pinpoint the sound. Short duration, high lift cams do tend to generate more valve train noise too. It typically doesn't do too much.

    Like you said, probably want to plan on making a weekend free to change the chain (I typically drop the oil pan and clean it out when I do this). If there is still a slight tick from the valve train I'd probably wave it off as normal.

    Also, the value of power flushing the transmission has been debated for some time. I am not a fan of it because it tends to force debris through the system. I'm more a fan of the multi change method, where you never get 100% oil change out but you drain and refill a bunch of times in a row. If your transmission has the filter under the pan, then you can change that about half way through. The Japanese transmissions don't typically like being flushed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •